Scottish Household Survey 2018 – Key Findings

The Scottish Household Survey 2018 was published in September 2019. Karen Robertson, Senior Research Manager, Historic Environment Scotland, has pulled together the key findings for the historic environment sector.

It should be noted that figures from 2018 onward are not directly comparable with previous years, due to substantial changes that were made to the culture questions in 2018. Including changes in question wording, categories and order of asking questions. The 2018 culture data will be treated as a new baseline.

Chapter 12 – Culture and Heritage

In 2018, 34% of adults had visited a historic place in the last 12 months.

Attendance at historic places by gender:

  • Men: 35%
  • Women 33%

Attendance at historic places by age:

Adults16 to 2425 to 3435 to 4445 to 5960 to 74 

75 plus

 

ALL
Historic Place303945363016 

34

 

Attendance by Highest Level of Qualification:

The most marked differences between those with degrees and no qualifications can be seen for trips to the cinema (70 per cent and 23 per cent respectively) and visits to historic or archaeological places (54 per cent and 11 per cent respectively).

AdultsDegree, Professional qualificationHNC/HND or equivalentHigher, A level or equivalentO’ Grade, Standard grade or equivalentOther qualificatioNo qualificationsAL
Historic Place54373223121134

Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by area deprivation Percentage of adults, 2018 data:

The most noticeable differences between the least deprived and most deprived can be seen for visits to historic or archaeological places (45 per cent and 20 per cent respectively) and the theatre (44 per cent and 21 per cent respectively).

Attendance by Scottish Index of Multiple Deprivation (SIMD):

Adults20% Most deprived23420% Least deprivedScotland
Historic Place202837394534

Attendance at cultural events and visiting places of culture in the last 12 months by net annual household income Percentage of adults, 2018 data:

Attendance at individual events or places was consistently highest for adults with the highest net annual household income. The biggest differences between those with a net annual household income of over £30,000 and those with a net annual household income of between £0 and £10,000 can be seen for trips to the cinema (69 per cent and 42 per cent) and visits to historic or archaeological places (46 per cent and 23 per cent).

Adults£0-£10,000£10,001 – £20,000£20,001 – £30,000Over £30,000All
Historic Place2321314634

Attendance by Long-Term Physical or Mental Health Condition:

In 2018, cultural attendance was lowest among adults with a physical or mental health condition that caused long-term major reduced daily capacity. Fifty-two per cent of those with a condition that caused long-term major reduced capacity attended or visited a cultural event or place compared with 86 per cent attendance for those with no condition.

AdultsYes, causes long term major reduced daily capacityYes, causes long term minor reduced daily capacityYes, but no reduced daily capacityNoneAll
Historic Place1330383834

Chapter 7 – Internet

Home internet access has increased steadily over time, reaching an all-time high of 87 per cent of households in 2018.

  • Forty-six per cent of households with internet access had a subscription to a superfast broadband service, an increase from 30 per cent in 2017.
  • Households with lower incomes and households in Scotland’s most deprived areas were less likely to have home internet access than higher income households and those in less deprived areas, but the gap has narrowed in recent years.
  • Around one in eight (13 per cent) adults do not use the internet at all.
  • Older adults were less likely to use the internet, but the divide in internet use between younger and older adults has narrowed over time.

Chapter 9 – Local Services

In 2018, 20.1 per cent of people agreed that they can influence decisions affecting their local area. This is a decrease of 2.6 percentage points since last year, and is similar to the level of 19.6 per cent in 2007 – the lowest level since first measured.

  • In 2018, 34 per cent of adults said they would like to be more involved in the decisions their council makes that affects their local area, compared to 20 per cent who felt they can influence decisions affecting their local area (Figure 9.2).
  • Around a fifth (22 per cent) of adults agreed that their council is good at listening to local people’s views before it takes decisions.

Chapter 10 – Environment

Respondents were presented with four different statements about the problem of climate change and asked which, if any, came closest to their own view.

  • The proportion of adults who viewed climate change as an immediate and urgent problem increased by more than one third between 2013 and 2018, from 46 per cent to 65 per cent.

Chapter 11 – Volunteering

In 2018, 48 per cent of adults provided unpaid help through formal and / or informal volunteering in the last 12 months.

  • Levels of formal volunteering have remained relatively stable over the last 10 years, with around three in 10 adults providing unpaid help to groups, clubs or organisations. In 2018, 26 per cent of adults had provided unpaid help to groups, clubs or organisations in the last 12 months.
  • In 2018, 36 per cent of adults provided unpaid help through informal volunteering.
  • The profile of formal volunteers has also remained relatively stable over time and the profile of informal volunteers is similar to that of formal volunteers. Overall, Volunteers were more likely to be: • women • from higher income groups • from rural areas • from less deprived areas. The profile for heritage is below.

Adults who did voluntary work in the last 12 months in Culture and Heritage:

  • Men: 6%
  • Women: 5%

Volunteers by age:

Age16 to 2425 to 3435 to 4445 to 5960 to 7475 plusAll
%3%3%5%5%9%8%5%

Read the full report Scottish Household Survey 2018: Annual Report.

 

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